Tag: cbhg

Community Lanterns Parade

Join in or come and watch.
The fourth of our illuminated winter wodland afternoons. Bring your pre-made lanterns or come early and join in the afternoon workshop.
(see calendar for previous  lantern making opportunities)

As dusk falls artist Sophie Handy and our guest performers will lead us all in a short parade around the Gardens and our illuminated mushroom village.
We finish with a seasonal performance suitable for all the family.

Free cup of hot chocolate and toasted marshmallows complete the community get together.
Come early to make your lantern and take home tree decoration

FREE MAKE AND TAKE workshops:
Lantern making session:
Make a lantern from paper and bamboo (takes about 2 hours) 
Natural Christmas Tree Decorations: 
Make a twig star or glittery pine cone or …

TICKETS:
£3 for anyone over 4 years old.
Family ticket £10 Free for Garden members and holders of Family Activity Annual Pass
[ticket prices are a contribution to covering our charity’s costs for this and other events]

Share

* event cancelled* Enchanted woodlands, carol and mummers

Due to predicted weather conditions and warnings we have reluctantly cancelled Sunday 10th Lantern event. Our apologies to everyone for the disappointment this causes (to us all!) . We  intend and hope to go ahead with the Lantern Parade day on Saturday 16th December. Please cehck back here, before setting out.

 

 

Lantern walks in the mushroom village, carol singing and Mummers play 
Join us for the third of our 4 fabulous afternoons full of woodland magic, light, lanterns and entertainment.

As well as the Woodland Walk, craft Make and Takes today also has seasonal entertainment from Castle Bromwich Singers and roustabout fun from Glorishears of Brummagem mummers play

Nature doesn’t stop when the sun goes down. Take a lantern and see if you can spot the growing mushroom lanterns village and charming woodland creatures.

FREE MAKE AND TAKE workshops:
Lantern making session: 
Make a lantern from paper and bamboo (takes about 2 hours)
Natural Christmas Tree Decorations:
Make a twig star or glittery pine cone or …
Keep warm with a hot chocolate and toasted marshmallows as you walk around the site together.

TICKETS:
£3 for anyone over 4 years old.
Family ticket £10 Free for Garden members and holders of Family Activity Annual Pass
£3 for anyone over 4 years old.
Family ticket £10 Free for Garden members and holders of Family Activity Annual Pass
[ticket prices are a contribution to covering our charity’s costs for this and other events]

On Saturday 16th December come and join in the grand finale. A Community Lantern Parade …
Take part or just watch…there’s lights, a surprise performance, fun and free hot chocolate and toasted marshmallows.

Share

The Strawberry Tree

  The Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo) is a easy tree or shrub to identify, having both flowers and fruit present at the same time. The strawberry (or I think more like lychee) like fruit take up to a year to ripen, so as last year’s fruits turn red, the flowers that will form next year’s fruit start to appear. The fruit is said to be edible, although not very tasty, which may be hinted at in it’s Latin name ‘unedo‘; coming from unum edo ‘I eat one’ – meaning after you have eaten one you wouldn’t want another one? Having not yet tried one I couldn’t say! Which is good news for the birds, leaving plenty of fruit for them to feast on during the colder months.

A member of the Ericaceae family of plants, most commonly known as heather, the flowers bear a strong resemblance to those of heathers, with bell-like downward facing flowers in small clusters.

You may have also seen this plant in a well known Morris & Co. design, used in fabrics and wallpapers where you can clearly see the red fruits and white flowers.

Have a wander down to the Lower Wilderness to have a closer look at these interesting plants..

 

 

 

 

Share

Kale

This week I planted out 40 Kale plants in the Batty Langley vegetable garden that have been quietly growing along in the greenhouse since September. We are trying three varieties, ‘Red Russian’, ‘Cavolo Nero’ and ‘Borecole – Green Curled Dwarf’.

Kale does well over the colder months, so will hopefully add some interest in the garden over the following darker months. As pigeons take a fancy to stripping the foliage off plants in the Brassica family, the precaution of placing net over the kale plants has been necessary to stop them becoming just tattered stems!

I have used two beds to grow the kale in, with 20 plants in each one, and to create a neat formal look the use of a tape measure was implemented to ensure even spacing.

The botanical name for kale is Brassica oleracea var. acephala, ‘Brassica’ being the genus consisting of cabbages, ‘oleracea’ meaning that the plant can be used as a vegetable and ‘acephala’ meaning ‘without a head’, i.e that the plant is loose leafed rather than with a head as many cultivated cabbages have. Kale has a long history as a food crop, being one of the most important green vegetables in Europe up until the end of the Middle Ages.

Share

New plants from old

At this time of year a lot of plants are starting to go to seed, so it is a good time to go around and collect some of them so we can grow new plants for next year. Some can be sown straight away (as we are doing so in the greenhouses), others can be stored to be sown in the spring. We are also taking cuttings of some of the plants in the garden, and hopefully by next spring we will have lots of lovely plants to sell or plant back out in the garden.

We are trying seeds collected from plants including Alcea (hollyhock), Lychnis (rose campion), Lupin, Astrantia, Galega (Goat’s Rue), Poppy and Phlomis. Some, such as Lychnis, have already germinated, others we are still eagerly awaiting for signs of life! The interesting thing about seeds is the genetic variation that can occur, so often the resulting plants will show some variation from the parent, especially in the case of the hollyhocks, where the colour of the flowers on each plant will be a surprise!

Cuttings taken include Lavender, Rosemary, Jasmine and Philadelphus. These are all semi-ripe cuttings taken from this year’s growth, so the base is firm but with soft growth still on the tips. They are put in pots together, and then when roots start to show at the base of the pot, they will be separated and given their own pot to grow on. Unlike seeds, cuttings create clones of the parent plant, so you know exactly what you are going to get.

We look forward to seeing how our seeds and cuttings do, and in the meantime they have a trusty guardian to keep an eye on them!

Share